A bill on religious discrimination will return, but will it pass through Parliament?

Even the watered-down version will struggle to get past the Coalition party room, let alone the downstairs room. So why bother?

Attorney General Michaelia Cash (Image: AAP)

The Morrison government wants to have a third slot to pass controversial laws on religious discrimination – first promised in 2017 – ahead of the election.

Attorney General Michaelia Cash hopes to introduce a bill next week in the final fifteenth parliamentary session of the year. To the best of our knowledge, the latest draft will avoid some of the significant, disproportionate protections offered to religious people in past sketches, but even a lowered version will struggle to get past the Coalition party room, let alone the lower room.

What has changed?

We haven’t seen Cash’s sketch but it follows two versions published by her predecessor Christian Porter. Both were incredibly impartial. Conservative religious groups such as the Australian Christian Lobby felt they were not given enough license to discriminate (although the faithful received more protection than any other group) and large corporations found them unfeasible.

Read more about how unpopular the proposed legislation is., And with whom.

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