Veterinarians care for 125 cats surrendered from a rural home

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A team of volunteer veterinarians neutered and neutered dozens of cats on Saturday surrendered from rural property north of Calgary.

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The Canadian Animal Task Force has set up a temporary surgical space in its northeast office to provide medical care for the animals, part of the 125 cats caught two weeks ago in need of extensive treatment.

“This particular situation, we thought, would be normal, 20 to 30 cats to care for, but when we entered the property, we realized that the conditions in which the cats were were not ideal at all,” said RJ Bailot, the charity. . executive director.

In addition to the behind-the-scenes volunteers and those who help care for the animals, several veterinarians donated their time Saturday to neuter and neutralize about 60 cats. The volunteers included Dr. Bryony George, a veterinarian who traveled to Calgary for the day of southeastern Alberta, where she works.

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“It’s a little nice to give back your time. You spend all those years wanting to be a vet, and you don’t really want to be a vet for money for the most part, so it’s really good to do, ”George said.

Cat is ready for surgery on Saturday, November 13, 2021, at The Canadian Animal Task Force in their northeastern Calgary office.
Cat is ready for surgery on Saturday, November 13, 2021, at The Canadian Animal Task Force in their northeastern Calgary office. Jim Wells / Postmedia

George said it’s important to neuter or neuter cats to prevent unwanted pregnancies – especially for cats that spend time outside. She said a female cat can have up to three puppies a year, with up to seven kittens per puppy.

In light of the unexpected influx of cat friends, the Canadian Animal Task Force is asking for donations to help cover the medical expenses for the cats. Treatment for all 125 animals – including medication for the feral cats and dental work in addition to spaying and neutering – is expected to cost more than $ 40,000.

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“Our organization, we’ve been around for many years, we’ve sterilized and neutered more than 20,000 animals now in the province, but a lot of people don’t know about us because we’re a smaller, grassroots organization,” Bailot said. said.

Cat is carried into a recovery area on Saturday, November 13, 2021, at The Canadian Animal Task Force in their northeastern Calgary office.
Cat is carried into a recovery area on Saturday, November 13, 2021, at The Canadian Animal Task Force in their northeastern Calgary office. Photo of Calgary Sun 7D /Jim Wells / Postmedia

“Today we are asking families and individuals to consider making a financial contribution to the task force, just so that we can provide the cats with the care they need and we can continue to offer the program.”

After the treatment, the cats will be transferred to a set of Calgary agencies for adoption, possibly including the MEOW Foundation and the Calgary Humane Society.

Large cat attacks like this happen more often than Calgary can think, Bailot said, and some people are afraid to seek help. He said the COVID-19 pandemic has brought an increase in these monopolistic situations.

“I feel that over the next time, we will see more situations similar to this one, but we are grateful that this particular individual has achieved it,” he said.

jherring@postmedia.com

Twitter: @jasonfherring

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